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of the plan will take money from the depositors. cyprus has an economy the size of vermont but the assets eight times more than the country's gdp. therein the financial woes come as no surprise to analysts. listen to what alan greenspan said friday. >> europe has been hanging over the american markets for quite a while. the removal of that risk, i think temporarily, i think it is only temporary, has enabled the underlying forces of the market to begin to come into vision. >> and today, the clearer vision that greenspan referred to was clouded the cyprus, we have the report by cyprus matters. >> reporter: cyprus is a smaller island with a smaller economy. but now they're watching what happens in the tiny mediterranean nation. >> it's a tiny nation. the reason we care about it is of course cyprus like it was in greece. it's what it means for the bigger nations if they follow and go down the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the bigge
schoumacher. the federal reserve board is responsible for deciding how much money the economy needs to grow. in the early 1970s, the fed held to a policy of using the money supply to try to keep the economy on course. in times of inflation, the fed tightened the money supply to squeeze excess dollars out of the economy. in times of recession, it increased the money supply to stimulate growth. but in 1975, the fed, under the chairmanship of arthur burns, faced a new and troubling dilemma -- caught between persistent inflation and a growing recession, how did chairman burns keep the economy on course? by late 1974, inflation had become a serious economic problem. under pressure from rising fuel prices, inflation rose to a staggering 12%. inflated interest rates had driven up the price of mortgages and brought the building industry to a standstill. sales of new cars and home appliances plunged. in september, president gerald ford asked congress to join him in a battle against inflation. my first priority is to work with you to bring inflation under control. inflation is domestic enemy number o
the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the biggest payers are the russians. >> they don't want to bail out the depositors because they are mainly russians. that's what the issue is. >> so finance makers said depositors are going be compensated. but with the stock market down some 60 percent those chairs are essentially wortless. >> the blanks are closed and won't open until votes on the bailout measure. people are waiting in lines at atms to withdraw money from their accounts and countries are worried around the world that citizens would take money out of their banks that's why even the most seasoned wall street veterans watching what happens in the tiny island in the mediterranean. for "nightly business report" i'm sue herrera. >> so what does it mean to american investors? we turn to the ceo of pimco the world's largest bond fund. i asked if the situation in cypress is unique or is it a serious issue for the u.s.? >> it is mai
the chairmen write a budget that balances that would make this economy much better. and i thank the chair and will yield the floor. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the clerk will report the amendments that are in order en bloc. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposed amendments en bloc for mrs. murray, amendment number 433 for mr. hatch amendment number 297, for ms. stabenow amendment number 432, for mr. grassley amendment number 156, for ms. mikulski amendment number 431, for ms. ayotte amendment number 158, for mr. cruz amendment number 202, for mrs. murray amendment numbered 439, for mr. crapo amendment numbered 222, for mrs. she haoepb amendment -- shihan amendment number 438. the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: mr. president, i want all of our members to understand that the second amendment that we will be voting on tonight is the ryan budget. there seems to be some resistance among my republican colleagues in bringing up the house republican budget for a vote, and it's pretty easy to see why that is. last year's house repu
corporations to pay their fair share. we voted on an approach that puts our economy first and foremost and makes sure that we are protecting, not threatening our fragile economic recovery. that is the kind of approach that is supported by the vast majority of the american people and the senate stood strongly behind that. mr. president, the senate strongly rejected the budget that passed the house of representatives yesterday. their budget would meet the goal by balancing by an arbitrary date but would do it in a way that would be devastating for our families and the economy, dismantling medicare and ending up cutting taxes for the rich while raising them on the middle class. and not only that, but it did rely on gimmicks and tricks to hit that arbitrary date. there is nothing balanced about that kind of approach, and i'm very glad that every member of the senate had an opportunity to be clear about where we stand on that. mr. president, the senate also voted yesterday to specifically reject the idea that medicare should be dismantled or voucherrized. i'm glad we had strong bipartisan s
's trip and whether this economy is going to go up. tomorrow, a lookat numbers you don't really quite see all the . melissa: i'm melissa francis and here's what's "money" tonight of the as we speak setting themselves up for a run on the bank. cypriot banks closed until next tuesday. people are scrambling to get as much as they can from atms. should you be worried about your money in the bank right now? we'll we'll find out from today's power panel. plus billionaire's take on the pulse of the economy and consumers. landry's is one of the country's largest estaurant and gammably companies. he is here to tell us where he sees the biggest headwinds and opportunities right now. >>> call it the anti-student loan. investors will pay school costs for a piece of student's future income. isn't that interesting? can this help solve the student debt crisis? the ceo behind it will explain this break through because even when they say it is a not it is always about money melissa: first today's market moment. the bulls are back in the driver's seat. the fed says its policy to stimulate the economy will
now. >>> thank you, victor. see you at the top of the hour. one america but two economies. the evidence is mounting, stocks, jobs, housing, recent data show all three are improving big time, but not everyone is feeling it. poll finds 55% say buying stocks right now is good and 43% say a good idea. 69% describe the economy as poor or very poor. only a third say the economy is in good shape and retirement, are you prepared? a survey from the employee benefit research institute asks americans 25 and older and only 13% feel confident they'll have enough money to retire comfortably. it was more than twice that percentage before the recession, 49% those two slices on the left of your screen said they were not too or not at all confident, that's the highest percentage that group has ever recorded. will cain is a cnn contributor and good friend of the show and marc lamont hill, associate professor, stocks are up 10%, in the post crisis world do the rich get rich, and everyone else just runs in place? >> yes because the rich are accessing good information and they know now is a gre
the markets are in a bubble right now, and that the economy is recovering. >> we still have a lot of work to do. but there doesn't seem to be any push to create a crisis over the debt limit or over shutting down the government. i think that's helpful. we've had economic data come out for quite a while now showing that we have a resilient economy that is growing. >> retail sales were growing. they came in better than expected for the month of february, rising 1.1%, the best numbers since september. analysts were concerned about the impact of gasoline prices and the increase in the payroll tax for us, but consumers are still spending money. important because that makes up about 70% of america's economic growth. and if you're looking for something new to buy, samsung will be happy to oblige. introducing its new galaxy 4 smartphone this week. the phone features a five-inch screen, a larger battery and a screen you don't have to touch, but just hover your fingers over. samsung is apple's main competition in the smartphone market. >>> well, the markets setting new records almost every day, and
american companies are doing well and the economy is starting to look up, but there's no denying this it rally is in large part fuelled by the fed, which has kept interest rates so low you can't make money anyone other than than the housing and stock markets. to help prop up the down economy, the fed has been pumping money into the system every month in exchange for bonds. that increases the money supply. it drives down interest rates. for awhile now shs the fed's funds rate and other loans that americans use to raise money that be at near zero. the hope is that banks and other lenders will use this cash to lend to consumers and businesses. borrowers will purchase homes and cars or start new businesses and get the economy churning again. it's been working. home prices are rising again due to low mortgage rates. more americans are finding jobs again. it won't stop printing until the unemployment rate dips below 6.5% which means the fed's will be at it until 2015. the flip side to the fed's action is that investors in bonds and interest baring accounts have suffered. it's a low-int
and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. a great show for you today. first up, the question for the economy. should we save or should we spend? what will get the economy moving faster? i'll talk to the chief proponent of spending. nobel prize winning economist paul krugman. then, the race for space. is america losing? china is building its own space station and the u.s. has to rely on russia to send our astronauts up to the stars. what is going on? >>> and the exploding middle class. in more than seven years it will triple in size to almost 2 billion people. it will change the world. we'll talk about how. >>> but, first, here's my take. those of you who follow the show reg lerly know i have long argued that cutting government spending in the midst of a weak recovery is not a path towards growth. but i have also argued that america does have a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is, the vast majority of our debt problems relate to the costs of health care in america. now that the debate over obama care is over, we should start thinking about how to get am
to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
to the economy. the economy needs financial assistance from the outside from the european union and i'm afraid the people running the show presumably the germans in the first instance have decided greek depositors should take a hit. the way that played out at least over the weekend was all depositors would take a hit of some kind no matter how small their deposit. it sales to be now an attempt to back away from that and focus on people with deposits over 100,000 euros targeting in part russians who hold a large amounts of money, claims on those cyprian banks. >> rose: when that happened what was the talk in the financial community citing your com a couple quotes one from dennis gotman the binging has been shaken to its roots. the banking depends on trust. he wrote a note to his clients trust that has now been shattered, broken and destroyed. jim o'neal at goldman sachs says astonishing with very little thought of containing. >> bailout 101 is you want to keep the money in the banks. you want to avoid a run on the banks. you want to avoid where people are standing outside wanting their cash be
to jump-start the economy, not just the stock market. let's go to nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. david: let's start, nicole. we start with fedex it was an extraordinary run-up. it was in the $100 range. it pulls back quite a bit. this is the biggest pullback since 2011? >> certainly is, the biggest pull back since 2011. concerns globally and also going to cut down what they're shipping over it asia. lauren: how is oracle looking ahead of their earnings release, nicole? >> we're watching oracle closely in the tax realm. we'll see whether or not they have earnings. [closing bell rings] david: best buy up another 5%. that stock can not be denied. as you her the bells are ringing on wall street. looks like the indexes are going to keep essentially where they were before and after ben bernanke began to talk. looked like they were sliding a bit. they stopped that slide. trading this the 50 to 60-point range on the dow. the s&p is doing better percentagewise. nasdaq is doing well. russell 2000, small and mid-sized caps doing well. there are interesting company stories and sect
mostly on the british economy. specifically on budget reform, childcare benefit, and performs to the national health service this is just over 30 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. businessorning, i had with ministerial colleagues and others and i shall have further such meetings later today. time minister the believes there is an alternative to his double debt and his loss of a aaa credit rating. is he aware that some in his cabinet believe there is an alternative for him? >> what this government is delivering is a million private sector jobs, the fastest rate of job creation in this country's history and banged on the debt by 25%. we have cut immigration by a third. we have a long road to travel, but we are going in the right direction. i'm sure that the prime minister will wish to add his condolences to the family and friends of christina at ken's who was murdered on a path to school in my constituency last thursday morning. the government is right to introduce minimum custodial substances for people convicted of threatening some
money into the economy? they let us know the exit plan for all of this. melissa: taxpayer outrage, bankrupt city in california paying out a million dollars in pay raises. they are bankrupt. lori: and paying races? crazy town. fedex says more customers are taking a less expensive option and it is hitting the bottom line. melissa: the cyber threat hit by online hackers putting financial firms here on high alert. but first, time for stocks now. nicole petallides is standing by. stocks posted solid gains ahead of the fed decision. nicole: that is right. everybody focused on the fed about an hour away from now. very accommodated if fed, and we're watching a market hitting new all-time highs in the dow jones industrial. of almost 56 points at the moment showing you some names that hit some highs today including nativ united technolo. hitting the highest levels we've ever seen for those names and we cannot leave out verizon. the highest levels we'v we haven in over 11 years. so while the shareholders have been enjoying great dividends, they can now also note multi-year highs as well. as
, tyler, all about the federal reserve and the economy. >> and cyprus in there for good measure. it was a very busy news day. we're here to tell you all about it. the federal reserve did it again. says it's going to keep interest rates where they are, near 0%. and it also says it's going to keep up its bond-buying program. the markets like what they heard from the fed along with a pledge from the new head of japan central bank about its own bold, easing measures to be unvailed on thursday. as a result, stocks moved higher here about. the dow touching an all-time intraday high. the blue chips did close 56 higher. nasdaq up by 25 and the s&p 500 rose for the first time in four sessions adding 10 points and taking us to within a few of an all-time high. steve leaseman tells us where we go from here. >> the federal reserve voting 11 to 1 to keep its policy in place and purchasing $85 billion a month in treasury and mortgage-backed securities in an effort to drive down long-term interest rates. but the federal reserve chairman in the press conference after the statement came out, sug
on the pulse of the economy and consumers. landry's is one of the country's largest estaurant and gammably companies. he is here to tell us where he sees the biggest headwinds and opportunities right now. >>> call it the anti-student loan. investors will pay school costs for a piece of student's future income. isn't that interesting? can this help solve the student debt crisis? the ceo behind it will explain this break through because even when they say it is a not it is always about money melissa: first today's market moment. the bulls are back in the driver's seat. the fed says its policy to stimulate the economy will continue and investors breathed a sigh of relief. dow came close to setting a new record high. the nasdaq marched back toward a 12-year high. the s&p 500 finished less than seven points away from its all-time high. here is who made the big money, proctor & gamble, chevron, travelers and johnson & johnson and united technologies all closed at all-time highs. congratulationses if you own those stocks. >>> all right. our top story tonight how the government in cyprus is make b
's effort to stimulate the economy. and the fed chairman made comments about what's going on in cyprus and the economic and financial difficulties in that small country. >> so a lot of uncertainties and questions about how the way cyprus has created for other countries and the like. it does have some consequence. having said that, you know, the vote failed and the markets are up today. and i don't think that the impact has been enormous. >> finally, the federal reserve in its statement for the first time made mention of fiscal restraint, which is another way of saying the sequestration that many analysts did not think was going to happen. fed chairman did say that he has concerns that reducing federal spending could reduce economic growth. back to you guys. >> well, two big companies that could be considered bellwether to the economy had two big misses today. oracle, the world's third largest software maker came in shy as new software sales sell. on the numbers, oracle shares took a big hit. >>> and the other miss, fed-ex, the company reported weakness in international market as well a
of the gridlock and dysfunction here in washington, d.c. they can see that our economy is slowly getting back on its feet, businesses are beginning to hire more workers, but my constituents and people across the country are very frustrated that the constant political crises are holding our recovery back right when we need to be doing everything possible to support it. after two years of debate about fiscal and economic policy and an election in which voters spoke loudly and clearly, the american people want their elected representatives to stop arguing and reach some solutions. mr. president, i come to the floor today to discuss a budget plan that meets this challenge. the senate budget that passed through the budget committee last week with the strong support of all ten democrats and two independents. it is a responsible and balanced plan that puts the economy first and tackles our deficit and debt responsibly and credibly, and i am hopeful that after it passes the senate, the house of representatives stands ready to compromise as well and we can come together around a balanced and bipartisa
cyprus get to this point? >> it is a small country. its economy is based on three things. tourism, a very pleasant place for people to go. shipping, as befits an island. above all, what is euphemistically called finance. in the 1990's and early in this century, what the banks in cyprus did was offer themselves around the world as a wonderful place to come and make a deposit. we will convert whatever currency you have into euros, which is a very good currency to have. we will pay you an unusually high interest rate and ask no questions. this is often called good banking. they got a lot of deposits. depending on the estimates you believe, the total deposits in the bank of cyprus or five to eight times larger than the total gdp of that economy, which is an absurd situation. and those banks in cyprus took all of those deposits and they did what banks are supposed to do, find prudent, safe, non- risky investments. like all the banks and the last 20 years, they failed. they found that investments. they did not to prudently. the banks fell apart. the whole cyprus economy, already impacted by thi
it is important to realize that it is possible to make investments in our economy today, create jobs, repeal the sequester, and still reduce our deficit in a responsible and laled way. -- and balanced way. in closing i urge my colleagues not to be scared by the rhetoric that sometimes we hear. instead, i urge my colleagues to support one of the multiple budget proposals that reduce our deficit responsibly while creating jobs today and protecting the important programs like medicaid and medicare for generations to come. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentlelady for being with me on the floor today. i'll say that we sometimes have some controversy in the rules committee, mr. speaker. there is a lot of responsibility that lies in the rules committee. with 435 folks here in this chamber. we all would like to have our say. we'd all like to have our say probably more than once. and the rules committee's tasked wi
our ailing economy and certainly not the answer for the hardworking folks back home in wyoming. when you start with one party doing the drafting and those who wrote the budget hold the majority on the budget committee, you can expect the bill to be one-sided. if you keep on doing whatever you a been doing, you can expect to get the same results. unfortunately, i believe that's what we'll see this week as we debate the budget here on the senate floor. the majority kept us in the dark on the budget until the last -- until last wednesday evening. we had to present our opening statements in the budget committee before we even sue the budget the majority -- even saw the majority the budget would offer. i do have to say in the defense of the majority that that's the way it's been for several years, both when the republicans were in charge and when the democrats are in charge. thea's thacharge that doesn't mean it is right. you have to share it. so then we had to turn around and start voting on the amendments the next morning in the budget committee and we weren't part of that process, beca
say that cyprus' economy is going to be in significant peril in the future. >> warner: and i gather a lot of these big depositors are russians, other foreigners? how much is known about them? >> a lot of the deposits particularly at the major banks are certainly from russians. cyprus has, you know, a long history with russia. in recent years, we had a lot of russians coming to this island basically sort of seeking a safe haven for their money, given some of the instability in russia. what has happened, however, is that that has drawn suspicion over time that, for example, some oligarchs or even some money of questionable origin is in the banking system. that's one reason why european leaders and particularly chancellor angela merkel wanted to take a much closer look at cyprus' banking sector as a part of this whole bailout. >> warner: how fundamentally will the cyprus economy be restructured or changed? >> the cyprus economy basically lives and breathes on finance. ever since it joined the european union it has shifted away from an economy that had produced a lot of goods over many
, growing the economy, strengthening the middle class and reducing the deficit. our proposal puts people to work this year with specific and targeted investments, while investing also in education, energy, research and infrastructure and keeping our commitment to america's seniors. our plan is fair, balanced, reasonable and responsible. it is pro-growth, pro-people, pro-america and approach favored by the majority in this country. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. horsford: thank you, congresswoman bass. and to focus on jobs and investing in our future, the fact that is pro-growth, pro-people and 70% of the american people support this type of approach is why the c.b.c. is offering this as an alternative to the house republican majority. and to speak further on the pro-growth needs of this budget, my representative -- my colleague, i should say in the new freshman class. it's been a delight to get to know her, the gentlelady from ohio, representative beatty. mrs. beatty: thank you so much. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss house budget committee chairman ryan's fisca
-sixth of the economy in order to be able to gain control of our lives, and of course it's going to be a mess. what does the government do that is good when it starts interfering with our lives? there are functions for the government. they need to remember what those things are and leave the rest of us alone. >> neil: what they discovered, as you warned -- this is prior to your prayer breakfast meet and greet with the president -- that all of a sudden the goodies would be showcased up front. the problems would be later. the goodies were fewer, the problems many more, and the cost of this potentially much, much hire than the thought. how is all of this rolling out now? >> well, of course the reason that it was done in secret, rather than in a transparent manner in which it was supposed to have been done, is because there are so many bad parts of it. there's so many obligations so many new taxes associated with it. it's incredibly expense simple. it was supposed to lower the cost. it has raised the cost of the premiums for average family, and in the neighborhood of $5,000. this is a disaster. and the real
reserve's two day meeting on the economy wraps up. that begins at 2:30 eastern time. >> coming up, the head of immigration and customs enforcement testifies about the release of nearly 2000 immigrants because of budget constraints. the 2014 budget plan put out by chairman paul ryan would balance the budget in 10 years and put in place medicare changes. the chamber should finish work on boating on the measure on wednesday. here is tuesday's debate. mr. ryan: i bring forward and present the budget resolution for the fiscal year 2014. we believe that we owe the american people a responsible balanced budget and that is precisely what we are bringing to the floor today. our budget balances the budget within 10 years and it does so without raising taxes. balancing the budget will help us foster a healthier economy, it will help us create jobs. in fact, two leading economists released a study analyzing our budget and its positive effects on the economy and jobs. in the first year they said it would, quote, boost the economy immediately, increasing both of our economy by a whole percentag
the economy grow more and more jobs be created because we have had the slowest recovery during this recession since any time after the world war ii, at least. very, very slow. but we have done something to a degree we have never done before, and that is borrow and spend to stimulate the economy. and someone has compared borrowing and spending to stimulate the economy to the idea of someone taking a bucket, scooping up water in one end of the swimming pool and pouring it into the other. you have got no net gain. the truth is you lose some of the water out of the bucket as you walk along the shore. in this case what we lose is, we lose interest on that debt indefinitely because there's no plan to pay down the debt. so this budget that's before us today does not balance, it does not put us on a sound path, it does not create confidence in the -- among the american citizens that the future is going to be sound, that we've gotten this country reoriented in a way that's going to produce long-term growth. indeed, it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's going to do exactly the opposite. it's goin
that shifts the fundamentals of our economy. the industrial revolution and introduction of the changes in society are powered by the exponential technology that changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant feedback account millennials are the forefront of that. how we move forward in this fast-paced world the millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we go out and also it's brought us a sense of easing adaptability. it's brought us to be resilient in the economic crisis that has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see that in one year it can be totally different because we saw how quickly it started and how quickly it might go away. there's a sense of optimism and social mindedness which i think came out of line 11 which is in the minds of a lot of this generation seeing our country in that momen
we all want to go. wwe want to have a growing economy, weal we want to deal with our deficit. these are challenging, complex goals. we can get there. even the action of this body last night in passing the fyn.2013 appropriations bill shows we can cooperate together and with the thousands get there. it is my hope that that will inspire us going forward. the question is this: we all agree that what has been done thus far in the area of deficit reduction equates to about $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction that has been done by the last congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls abo
company with extraordinarily small economy. the fact it would precipitate a run with the greek banks or italian banks and bring down the entire system in europe, fumbling along, kicking the can down the road is really pretty fried and we know from experience these events, whether in the balkins with the shooting of an arch duke or whether in cyprus with the shooting of a banking system can lead to fairly significant consequences for the entire european continent and us. >> so far, the worst-case scenario hasn't happened yet. so far. that's good. let me ask you, steve forbes. do you believe that the united states can make itself immune? are we strong enough economically, and financially, to withstand the kind of worst-case scenario that senator gregg discussed? >> the answer is no. we should have learned that from 2008 when these dominos start to topple. it hits everybody. and this is what is so inexplicable. why did the germans draw the line on this, for sheer domestic political reasons. they don't want to be bailing out russian oil gargs. they have an election this year. they have k
%, which meant it was getting broad support from all sectors of the economy. i did make a mistake, which was turning it over to iraqi politicians. i should have turned it over to judges, people who did not have a political ax to grind. on the army, there was no question it was the right thing to do not to recall the army. we should have not said it was disbanding it. the pentagon said it would be self-demobilized. it would have been a big mistake to have called the army back. it would have led to the break up iraq. the kurds were very clear they would secede. when we did try to bring back a single battalion in april 2004, it went immediately over to the insurgency and started shooting at americans. it did not work. building the army from the bottom up -- a new army from the bottom up -- was the right path. today, the iraqi army is the most respected institution in the country. >> when you look back your tenure in baghdad, it was a difficult time. are you proud of what you did? >> i am satisfied. proud is probably going to far. i think that the 3000 civilians who work in the cpa from 25 d
brands think of the economy and the american consumer? susie sits down with the top man at coca-cola. all that and more coming up right now on "nbr." good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. susie, once again, little cyprus making big economic noise today. >> you're right, tyler. actually a big win for citizens in cyprus. lawmakers rejected today an unpopular and unprecedented proposal to tax bank deposits. it was part of a larger eurozone bailout plan to rescue those banks and keep the nation solvent. the crucial vote came after a wave of protests, and as cypr t cypriots scrambled to withdraw cash from their atms. bertha coombs joins us with more on today's historic vote and what's ahead for cyprus? >> what's ahead is a very big question. the world was watching the tiny island nation again today, in a show of hands-on opposition, party members voted no on a tax and 10% of bank deposits, a condition set by eurozone officials to secure 10 billion euro bailout. many called it extortion. ruling party members abstained saying beyond saying no they need to find another plan.
economy. its banks are not highly connected with the rest of the international financial system. there is no risk of contagion here. >> adam, actually, of all the ideas you laid out, which do you think is the least bad of all those solutions? is it going ahead and letting the banks fail? >> that would be my preferred route. failure implies that the banks can't pay their depositors. they are restructuring. they will be very orderly. basically, the banks would be closed for two days. what would come out is when they reopen, the depositors would be the large depositors because the small depositors would be fully protected. the large depositors would be the owners of a bank and they would have deposits of somewhere between 50 1k3 60 or 70% of their money and the rest of the shares in the new bank. the banks would be solvent. the banks could be highly capitalized and they would then have access to the ecb for refinancing to provide any liquidity. >> and the fallout from that would be that the russians -- >> and basically -- >> the fallout for that is that the russians are the ones wh
those economies dramatically, weakens those countries. and it also weakens italy. >> you're saying potential contagion. finally, how does it get resolved? michelle is talking about a good bank/bad bank, nobody pays on deposits up to $100,000. the bailout is 10 billion euros from the european -- ecb. the bail-in is about $6 billion euros. so greece is looking for whatever they're looking for, $4 billion, $5 billion. or does europe bail that out even more? >> the biggest factor of all, dan and i were talking a couple minutes ago, the depositors above 100,000 will lose 40% to 50%. >> those are russians. they're going to be pissed off. >> the great systemic problem of giant bank failures is somewhat eliminated by what they're putting forward now. >> what do you think, dan? does this work? >> for our viewers i don't think it matters. the specifics are super interesting, we're going to go have a drink. what matters to people at home, what matters to the larger story is we decided that people's property in banks was not their own. >> in europe or in the u.s., too? >> in europe only. >> th
to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close those special interest tax loopholes that riddle our tax code, republicans said no. democrats proposed to offset unwise republican cuts to medical research like alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes research at n.i.h., republicans said no. democrats tried to cut the special interest spending in the tax code to offset republican cuts to students who rely on pell grants but republicans said no. mr. van hollen: i yield the gentleman another minute and a half. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. ms. castor: the democrats in the budget committee proposed to strengthen medicare and replace the republican plan to turn medicare into a voucher program. all it does is simply shift the cost tour families and older neighbors. mr. speaker, this republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it is a
bernanke will keep printing to bail out barack obama's weak economy. and print as many yen as it takes to bail out japan. the markets truly love it. europe is the odd man out. they've given ultimatum to cyprus, no bailout if you can't get it together by next tuesday. here is something else to get you fired up. cyprus wants to nationallize y payshun money. "varney & company" is about to begin. [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futureses move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. all on thinkorswim. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >> thursday, march 21st. m headline today, ben bernanke
affect the u.s. economy. presumably including cyprus. as well as the improving u.s. job market, and strong housing sector. and as we wait for fed officials to wrap up their meeting tomorrow, it's expected they will leave interest rates unchanged. joining us to talk more about the fed, randall krosner, former fed governor and now professor of economics at the university of chicago. i've not had the benefit of being in those meetings. you have, and i'm curious to know, do you think cyprus came up? if so, how? and how would the fed governors and members of the fomc handicap its possible effects on the u.s. economy? >> it certainly would have come up, i think, if some analogies with iceland from a number of years ago. even a smaller country, only 250,000 people, not a million people, but it was something that we focused on. we worried about and tried to think of what the implications are. here it's clear the europeans have made i think a terrible mistake in making this proposal. that potentially could undermine confidence, and that could have knock-on effects not only for the whole
jobs and grow the economy. democrats disagree. they think you do not send enough money to washington. their budget increases taxes by $1.5 trillion on top of the hundreds of billions they have already added to your tax bills at the beginning of the year. they also have no plans to say the entitlement programs even though the president knows doing is not about the costs an option. doing nothing makes no sense. budgets are about setting priorities. republicans realize we have a moral obligation to spend your hard earned tax dollars wisely. we should but only what we need to cover the functions of government and not a dollar more. that is why we support reforms to fix the programs washington should be funding and a limited programs it shouldn't and balance a budget. federali note that the government wastes hundreds of dollars each year. we need to identify and remove wasteful areas of the budget. instead the president has decided to cut on order security, first responders, and law enforcement. the director of u.s. immigration and customs recently testified before a house subcommittee th
schoolers? the right answer later in the grapevine. up next, the state of the u.s. economy. what are the chances of another recession here? for over 75 years people have saved money with...ohhh... ...with geico... ohhh...sorry! director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) director's voice: keep it together. i'm good. i'm good. for over 75...(uncontrollable laughter). what are you doing there? stop making me laugh. vo: geico. saving people money for over seventy-five years. gecko: don't look at me. don't look at me. by the armful? by the barrelful? e carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> bret: no major changes on the horizon in how the federal reserve is dealing with the economy. while fed chief bernanke says things are getting better not eve
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